Travel Idioms


  • Backseat driver: a passenger who critiques or criticizes your driving
  • Sunday driver: one who drives slowly and makes unexpected maneuvers
  • Greasy spoon: usually applied to restaurants – especially diners – serving cheap fried or grilled foods
  • Pit stop: to stop for gas, snacks, beverages, restrooms, etc.
  • Red-eye flight: any flight departing late at night
  • One for the road: having one more of something (especially a drink) before departing
  • Live out of a suitcase: to continuously travel from place to place
  • Hit the road: to begin traveling
  • Pedal to the metal: to accelerate or speed up
  • Off the beaten path/track: something that is out of the mainstream, rarely frequented or known
  • Fleabag motel/roach motel: shabby, low-priced accommodations
  • Running on fumes: driving with very little gasoline in the tank

Idioms related to food



  • Cooked to perfection – food that is cooked to a very high standard

This steak looks delicious. It was cooked to perfection.

  • Cook up a storm – to cook an amazing meal(s) and usually a large quantity of it

My grandmother was a great cook. She used to cook up a storm every time we visited her.

  • Eat like a horse – to eat a very large quantity

I have to cook every day. My son eats like a horse.

  • Smart cookie – intelligent

My daughter is the best student in her class. She is a smart cookie.

  • A piece of cake – very easy

This test is a piece of cake. I’ll finish in 5 minutes.

  • Bring home the bacon – earn money to feed the family

David  pays all the bills. I’m sure he is the one who brings home the bacon.

More idioms…..

Idiom: “if the shoe fits, wear it”shoes3

Meaning: If the description is correct, accept it.


Veronica: My friends keep saying that I’m always late. I don’t understand why they have to complain so much…

Elena: Well, you’re late all the time. I know you don’t like it when people complain about you being late, but if the shoe fits, wear it.


Idiom: “to monkey around”136056095ccb2f51c9179a487de24345

Meaning: To play around; to do something without a real purpose.


Veronica: Ughh…..I have such a bad headache.

Elena: Why? What’s wrong?

Veronica: I wish my students would be more serious and study. They want to just monkey around.


Idiom: “on pins and needles”pincushion

Meaning: Anxious or excited about something.


Veronica: What’s wrong with Dana today?

Elena: Oh…she’s on pins and needles. She’s been waiting for a call from her boyfriend all morning.

Lovely idioms :)

Idiom: “as quiet as a mouse”10

Meaning: Extremely quiet, a person that doesn’t talk too much


Veronica: Do you know Maria? She is my new student. I can’t make her say anything in class.

Elena: I know her. I had her in my conversation class last month. She is as quiet as a mouse


Idiom: “it’s raining cats and dogs”UTH4450

Meaning: It is raining very hard


Elena: Are you going to the bank today?

Veronica: Yes, I’m leaving in 5 minutes.

Elena: You’d better take your umbrella with you. It’s raining cats and dogs.


Idiom: “as sharp as a tack”sharp_as_a_tack_1_thumb

Meaning: An extremely smart person


Veronica: Have you met the new grammar teacher?

Elena: Yes, I’m so excited to work with him. He is as sharp as a tack.

Veronica: Really?!

Idioms again :)

Idiom: “money doesn’t grow on trees”toonvectors-19182-140

Meaning: You should be careful how much you spend  because money is a limited resource


Veronica: I really want to get a new car. I love that BMW I saw yesterday. I think I’ll get it.

Elena: Veronica, I don’t think you can afford that car. You know, money doesn’t grow on trees.


Idiom: “don’t cry over spilt milk” (“it’s no use crying over spilt milk”)toonvectors-22680-140

Meaning: Getting upset over something that has already happened and that it can’t be changed


Elena: Look at my new dress! I can’t believe the cat ruined it completely. What am I gonna do now? What am I supposed to wear? My day is completely ruined!

Veronica: It’s no use crying over spilt milk. Let’s go buy another dress and enjoy the party tonight.


Idiom: “to bury your head in the sand”paranoid_ostrich_1289795

Meaning: To refuse to think about a bad situation or experience / To ignore you’re in a dangerous situation


Veronica: I told my sister that her husband is cheating on her two months ago. However, she refused to listen to me and now it’s too late. He wants a divorce.

Elena: She should have listened to you and done something about it instead of just burying her head in the sand.



More idioms :)

Idiom: “to go around in circles”

Meaning: Not accomplishing anythingdownload


Veronica: We’ve been going around in circles all day trying to decide on an ad for the website. It’s 8:00 pm and we still haven’t decided!

Elena: Hmmmmm……


Idiom: “to be in the dog house”

Meaning: You are in troublek17697158


Veronica: My lovely husband came home at 4:00 am last night. Can you believe that?

Elena: Oh….I guess he’s in the dog house now.


Idiom: “to run against the clock”

Meaning: To have a tight deadlinek22638307


Elena: When do you have to submit your application for that teaching position?

Veronica: Today by 5:00 pm.

Elena: You’d better hurry up and do it. You’re running against the clock.


Idiom: “when fish fly”

Meaning: Something that will never images



Veronica: I’ll buy a pink dress tomorrow.

Elena: Yeah, right! You’ll buy a pink dress when fish fly!


Idiom: “money pit”

Meaning: A business, a project or a possession (a house, a car) that

requires more and more money with little hope of profit. images (2)


Veronica: See this new car? It’s a money pit! I have to take it to the mechanic every week….

Elena: Why don’t you get rid of it and take the subway like everybody else?


Idiom: “a fat cat”

Meaning: A very rich and powerful personimages (1)


Veronica: Look at that guy’s car! It’s a Ferrari!

Elena: He’s a fat cat for sure.